Gotland: north, east and Fårö

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Our first full day on Gotland we wanted to discover as much as possible and decided to head north and east (the next day we went south and west) and our first stop was the Lummelunda Cave, one of Scandinavia’s biggest caves.

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It’s pretty touristy, but well worth a visit as it’s both pretty cool to see, but it’s also interesting to hear how the cave was discovered. I remember visiting when I was four years old, and although it was probably more amazing experiencing the cave as a child it was still nice to come back as an adult and experience it in a different way.

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After the cave experience we took the car ferry to Fårö where the nature is absolutely amazing. The island is barren and stony, but also eerie and pretty. And there’s sheep (and sheep huts) almost everywhere (Fårö translates as Sheep Island). 

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We found the most amazing café here, just by following a sign I thought looked promising, that I would recommend everyone to visit, but we also stopped for fika at the famous and more traditional Sylvis Döttrar bakery. Reviews to follow.

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After that we drove back to Gotland and headed east to Furillen, a former limestone quarry that’s extremely beautiful. The restaurant was closed unfortunately, but it was worth stopping here for the nature alone.

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We covered quite a lot of the island just driving around (and stopping when we saw a good photo opportunity).

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Although Gotland is small there are things to see and do (and eat!) just about everywhere, so it’s good to be selective. The Gotland Guide from the ferry over is great to use and we kept one in the car the whole time.

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Zetas trädgård, a nursery near Stockholm

 

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On the Saturday morning of our Stockholm weekend, we travelled (by metro and bus) to a lovely nursery called  Zetas trädgård, near Kungens Kurva. My keen gardener mother was very excited to come here, but dad and I could also see the appeal. It’s a beautiful nursery, an oasis, with lots of plants and decorative things to buy. Plus a lovely café with seating both inside and outside serving still warm cinnamon buns straight from the oven, nice sandwiches and soups. That’s where we hung out while mum walked around looking at plants!

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Dad and I first shared a cinnamon bun and had a hot chocolate each and then we had lunch with mum a bit later.

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The ham and avokado crème on rye was really nice, just like the sourdoug baguette with local washed-rind cheese and fig jam.

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A lovely spot for a café, don’t you think?!

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We had a lovely few hours here, and although we were mainly for my mother’s sake I still had a great time, and even found two nice vases to buy.

Zetas Finsmakarens Trädgård, Blombacken 2, 141 70 Segeltorp (Kungens Kurva), Stockholm

 

Cakes at Konditori Antoinette, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Growing up in the south of Sweden we made many trips to Denmark and Copenhagen. Before the famous bridge we took small ferries but the bridge certainly made it even easier to visit.

The café where Maria, Daniel and I had cakes during our last visit, has been a long standing place for me to visit when visiting Copenhagen. My mother’s friends first introduced it to me as their breakfast place, a tradition Maria and I made our own as well. But since then it’s changed shape a few times.

This visit we found out it’s a proper patisserie with award-winning cakes which we thoroughly enjoyed while resting our legs out in the shade. You see, the absolute best thing about this place is the location. You just take a turn off Strøget through a small street and voilà you have a nice little oasis without tourists.

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We were definitely impressed by the cakes (left with white chocolate, almonds and raspberries, top with chocolate and passion fruit and bottom a tarte with chocolate, creme patissiere and strawberries) but less so by the plastic menus.

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After the cakes we walked around the city some more and looked in a few shops before going for dinner (review to come). It was one of those perfect days when you have no plans but end up finding new great places (and old favourites).

Konditori Antoinette,  Østergade 24, 1100 København, Denmark

Fika at Slottsträdgårdens café, Malmö, Sweden

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Fika is one of my favourite Swedish words. It covers a whole range of foods that you can have with a cup of coffee or tea. Openfaced sandwiches. Cake. Biscuits. Cake and biscuits.

In my parents’ house we have a lot of fika . If you get up early you have fika in between breakfast and lunch, and for lunch, if you’re not having hot food, you can have fika again. Then you have afternoon fika and after-dinner fika.

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st2Two weekends ago when I was in Malmö on the Sunday I had fika with my parents and we went to probably the cosiest café in town, Slottsträdgårdens café, located in the park near the castle (the museum). The grounds are wonderful right now with a tulip exhibition and flowering cherry trees.

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You can either sit in a green house or outside; we did both as it was chilly when we got there but later when the sun came out it was nice to soak up some sun outside.

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For the fika my mother and I both had the raspberry and rhubarb crumble with custard while my father had a cinnamon bun. We also had coffee and organic juices and iced tea. All very good!

Slottsträdgårdens kafé, Malmöhusvägen 8, 211 18 Malmö, Sweden