Recipe: Crema Catalana

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If you love a creme brûlée but don’t always have the patience to make it, then this is for you. This Spanish cousin of the creme brûlée is much easier to make as it doesn’t need the water bath oven time, but it still offers that caramelised lovely sugar on top of the vanilla crème.

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Crema Catalana, serves 6

100 ml (80 g) caster sugar 

300 ml cream 

1 tbsp corn flour

5 egg yolks

250 ml milk 

1 tsp vanilla 

1 pinch of sugar per bowl for serving 

Whisk ety yolks, corn flour and sugar until fluffy in a bowl. Bring milk, cream and vanilla almost to the boil. Remove from heat and pour little by little into the egg yolk mixture while whisking. Pour the milk mixture back into the pan and let it thicken on low heat while stirring. Pour into bowls when it has thickened and leave to cool. Refrigerate until serving. 

Scatter the bowls with a little sugar and blow torch until golden (or in lieu of a blow torch use the grill on the oven to caramelise the sugar). Serve with berries. 

Recipe: daim ice cream cake

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In my family we all love the daim bar. I grew up eating them for fika instead of a cookie sometimes (but only half a daim bar each!) and my favourite ice cream is still the daim ice cream. Either as scoops or the daim cone we have in Sweden.

So I don’t know why it took me so long to try this daim ice cream cake recipe, as it basically has my name written all over it!

I made it for pudding in the summer for some friends of mine and we all loved it, although I thought it was borderline too sweet. (Who have I become?!) So when I made it for the second time, only a few days later, for dinner with my parents, I changed the proportions a bit. The cake base is really lovely but also very sweet so by adding more ice cream on top the base appeared less dominant and sweet. So this is not the original recipe, but my adaptation of it,  and isn’t that the beauty of sharing recipes really?! That we can all change them after our own preferences.

And yes, of course it was a hit with my daim bar loving parents as well!

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Daim ice cream cake, serves 6-8

Translated from and adapted after Söta Saker’s recipe.

Base:

100 g butter, softened

100 ml golden caster sugar

100 ml oats 

2 tbsp cocoa 

1 tsp vanilla

2 daim bars

Filling:

150 ml double cream 

75 ml caramel sauce 

3 daim bars 

Dekoration:

daim sprinkles

caramel sauce

Mix butter, sugar, oats, cocoa and vanilla to a sticky batter. Chop the daim bars coarsely and mix into the batter. Press the batter onto a baking parchment covered cake tin. 

Whip the cream and add the caramel sauce bit by bit, while whipping until soft peaks. Chop the daim bars and add to the cream mixture. Pour the cream mixture into the tin. Cover with cling and put in the freezer for at least 4 hours or over night. Remove from the freezer a few minutes before serving and decorate with caramel sauce and daim sprinkles. 

 

Recipe: nutella semifreddo

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When I go to Sweden in the summer and for Christmas it’s quite hectic socially as I try to fit in friends and family. And as we all like to socialise around food there’s is also a lot of eating; both at home, at friends’ houses and out at restaurants.

At one lovely lunch this summer my best friend Emma had made this delicious semifreddo for pudding, and as the Nutella (and anything hazelnutty) aficionado that I am, I immediately asked for the recipe. And although this is a frozen dessert, it’s by no means reserved for summer – ice creams, semifreddo and parfait can be enjoyed year round!

Nutella semifreddo, serves 10

2 store-bought meringue bases

4 egg yolks

4 egg whites

2 tbsp caster sugar

500 ml double or whipping cream

400g lukewarm nutella

Separate the egg yolks from the whites. Add the whites and half of the sugar (1 tbsp) to a bowl and beat until stiff peaks. In a separate bowl, beat the egg yolks with the remaining sugar (1 tbsp) until pale and fluffy. Finally beat the cream in a third bowl until small peaks. 

Place the first meringue base in a springform (ø20-25 cm) and crush the other. Fold the egg yolk and egg white mixtures into the cream and add the crushed meringue. Drizzle in the lukewarm (to make it easier to pour – if too set microwave for a few second until runny) nutella. Pour the cream mixture into the springform, cover with cling and freeze for at least 4-5 hours, but preferably overnight, before serving.  

Recipe: molten chocolate cake 2.0

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This classic of a pudding is still a favourite of mine. There is something so comforting about a warm and gooey chocolate pudding that it makes me really happy. I already have a recipe for this on the blog, but I must say that this recipe is even better hence why I’m blogging about it again!

I prefer to serve my molten chocolate cakes with vanilla ice cream as I love the contrast between the warm cake and the cold ice cream but you whipped cream and berries works just as well.

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Molten chocolate cake 2.0, serves 2

Adapted from  Smitten Kitchenäs recipe.

55 g unsalted butter

2 tsp cocoa (and more to decorate)

85 g dark chocolate

a pinch of sea salt 

1-2 tbsp sugar

1 egg +1 egg yolk

Pre-heat the oven to 230C. Butter two regular sized ramekins and cover with a think coating of cocoa. 

Break the chocolate in smaller pieces and place in a bowl together with the butter. Melt the chocolate and butter until 2/3 melted either over a Bain Marie or in a microwave. Beat until it has all melted. Add sugar and salt. Lastly add the egg and egg yolk and beat an extra 20-30 times extra (important) until a glossy mixture. Add the cocoa and mix it in. 

Divide the batter between the ramekins. Bake for 7-9 minutes and leave to cool for a minute. Turn onto plates (use pot holders!) and powder with cocoa. Serve with vanilla ice cream and eat immediately.  

 

 

 

 

Recipe: chocolate pots (or chocolate pudding)

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These chocolate pots are a childhood favourite of mine, and this version with actual chocolate (and not just cocoa) is the best one I’ve come across yet. Mamma found the recipe in a cookbook by Anna Bergenström and kindly passed it on me.

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I like these really cold with pillowy cream on top and preferably sprinkles on top of that for a hint of sweetness and crunch, but it probably looks more grownup like this, with just some sieved cocoa powder on top!

When I made these for two of my American friends, they told me these are called chocolate pudding in the US (just like the Swedish name!), whereas here in the UK a pudding is any dessert.

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Chocolate pots (or chocolate pudding), serves 4

Adapted after and translated from Anna Bergenström’s recipe.

600 ml whole milk

75 ml corn flour

4 tbsp caster sugar

3 tbsp cocoa

1 egg

2 tsp vanilla

50 g dark chocolate

For serving:

lightly whipped cream

sieved cocoa or sprinkles

Add everything apart from the chocolate to a medium sized sauce pan. Bring it to a gentle simmer while whisking, until the mixture has thicken quite a lot. Stir or whisk continuously 

Break up the chocolate. Remove the sauce pan from the stove and add the chocolate pieces to the mixture. Stir until it’s melted. Pour the mixture into a sieve to remove lumps and pour into small bowls or glasses. Cover them with cling (all the way down to the surface) and leave to cool. When cool, place in the fridge for 3 hrs to thicken. Serve with lightly whipped cream and either sieved cocoa or sprinkles.

Recipe: rhubarb custard tarte

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Spring. For me it’s about feeling the sun on my face. Shedding a few layers of clothing and watch all the flowers blossom.

And I get terribly excited about the fresh produce. First the wild garlic, then the asparagus, rhubarb and new potatoes.

At the moment we can enjoy all these things and it makes me rather giddy with happiness! FINALLY winter (although it wasn’t an awful one in London this year) is over!

To celebrate the arrival of Yorkshire rhubarb to the shops a few weeks ago I made a lovely puff pastry tart with pink lovely rhubarb (cooked just enough to still be a little firm) and a glorious custard. Eating this in the sunshine makes me so happy!

Custard rhubarb tarte, serves 6-8

Translated from and adapted after Tidningen Hembakat’s recipe.

1 roll all butter puff pastry

Custard (oven proof):

1 vanilla pod or 1 tsp vanilla

300 ml milk

50 g caster sugar

3 egg yolks

50 ml corn starch 

25 g butter

Warm milk, sugar and vanilla in a nonstick saucepan. Mix the egg yolks with corn starch in a bowl. Add the warm milk to the egg mixture a little by little. Then return the mixture to the saucepan and warm on medium heat until the mixture has thickened, approx 2 minutes. Whisk continuously. Remove from the heat and stir on the butter. Pour into a bowl, cover with cling (all the way down on the mixture) and leave to cool. 

400 g rhubarb, trim the ends

200 ml water

200 ml caster sugar

Cut the rhubarb into 4 cm long pieces and place in an ovenproof sig with sides. Bring sugar and water to the boil in a saucepan. Pour the syrup over the rhubarb and place in a 100C oven for 20 minutes. Leave to cool completely. 

Assembly: 

Roll out the puff pastry and place on a parchment paper lines baking sheet. Cut a thin incision only along the surfaces of the dough, approx 2 cm in from the edge, all around the dough. Prick the dough inside of the “frame” with a fork. Pre-bake the dough for approx 7 minutes (it should bake a bit but not colour) in a 200C oven. 

Remove from the oven and spread a thick layer of custard onto the dough inside the “frame” and place the rhubarb pieces on top with a little space in between. Bake for another 12-15 minutes until golden brown. Remove from oven. Leave to cool and dust with icing sugar before cutting into smaller pieces and serving.

Recipe: Italian meringue covered fruit

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This is a perfect Friday night pudding as it’s quick to whip up (don’t let the Italian meringue scare you, I promise it’s easy!) and feels really fresh after a pizza or whatever Friday night cravings you may have.

Use any (seasonal) fruit and berries you like – they don’t get warm even if you use the grill to brown the meringue, but it’s even easier with a creme brûlée torch, and then you could also put the fruit in a glass so you can see it. Very pretty!

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Italian meringue covered fruit, serves 2

Mixed fruit, cut into pieces and berries (enough to almost fill the vessels you’re using), such as:

1 blood orange

1 apple

blueberries

raspberries

Italian meringue:

1 egg white

75 ml caster sugar 

75 ml water

50 ml caster sugar

To serve:

lightly whipped cream

Divide the fruit between two ramekins (or glasses if not using the oven) – they should be almost full. 

Pour 75 ml caster sugar and 75 ml water into a saucepan and bring it almost to the boil. Once the sugar has melted the syrup is done. Remove from heat. Meanwhile beat the egg white until fluffy with an electric whisk. Pour in some of the remaining sugar and beat some more. Pour in the syrup while beating continuously. Then add the remaining sugar and beat until you have a glossy meringue that is set enough that you can turn the bowl upside down without it sliding out. 

Use a spatula to cover the ramekins with the meringue. Put the grill on the oven to 250C and place the ramekins underneath it. Keep the door open and an eye on the ramekins as the meringue browns quickly and you don’t want it going too dark. Remove with mittens as the ramekins go warm (but the fruit inside doesn’t). Or skip this step all together and use a creme brûlée torch to brown the meringue. Serve with lightly whipped cream.