Copenhagen: Bæst Revisited!

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Since we only go to Copenhagen once a year it’s tricky to balance the urge to go back to old favourites with the excitement of trying new ones. So we do a bit of both, resulting in a day of feasting our way around the beautiful city. But as we get around mostly by walking it works!

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So after trying a new bar, a new restaurant for lunch and another new bar, we went back to Bæst for their amazing pizzas! We loved it so much last year and it was just as good this time around.

But since we had had something yummy to eat at Rudo too, we didn’t go crazy ordering all the menu, which we did last year. We had just one starter; the garlic bread with lardo which was just lovely!

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And then we moved on to what we were here for: the pizzas! Or more specifically, that Margherita I’ve dreamt about for a whole year! And yep, it was just as amazing as I remembered it!

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But we did broaden our horizons a little trying two new pizzas too. This one with stracciatella, garlic, mushrooms and herbs was really nice (but almost a little too herby for my liking).

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And lastly we had this one with mozzarella, sun-dried tomatoes, prosciutto and rocket. Also really really good, but the margherita is the best ever! So when you go (because it’s just a matter of time really, you totally should go!), make sure you ordered it!

Bæst, Guldbergsgade 29, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark

Welcoming December!

It’s December! I don’t know how we got here so quickly but although this month is pretty exhausting I do love everything it has to offer. Christmas lights, Christmas parties, all the sparkle and festive cheer and of course the food. So I thought I’d share my best December recipes with you, in case you want to add a little Scandi twist to your celebrations. We have glögg (Swedish mulled wine), two recipes for gingerbread, lots of recipes with saffron, the best rocky road and so much more!

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But let’s start with a little cocktail! I made this clementine prosecco drink with rosemary last year for the book club Christmas dinner and it was a real hit! It’s festive and in my opinon the best way to start a Christmas drinks party!

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Another favourite are these mini Jansson’s temptationsIt’s a classic Swedish Christmas dish with grated potatoes and onion, cream and anchovies. I know it sounds weird but you got to try it if you even remotely like dauphinoise potatoes. It’s compulsory (in a big dish) at every Christmas smorgasbord and every family have their own version of it. This is how my mamma makes it and it is of course the BEST!

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Does making your own gingerbread seem daunting? Then this recipe is for you! It’s quick to mix together in a pan and after it’s chilled in the fridge over night all you do is cut it and bake it. No rolling, no cookie cutters needed. And they’re so so yummy! And highly addictive!

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But if you’re itching to use your cookie cutters (I am, love my little collection of traditional – and other – shapes!) then this is the best recipe to use. They’re quite subtle in flavour but absolutely delicious and the dough holds up really well. I have noticed though that it’s easier to use on some surfaces than others so try your way. And make sure you chill it in the fridge overnight!

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Another super traditional Swedish Christmas biscuit are these crispy almond biscuits that we fill with cream and jam. Again I have the best recipe for you (thanks to mamma again!) that never fails or sticks to the mould. They’re called mandelmussla (almond mussle or clam) in Swedish which is just the cutest name!

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Next I’m going to share some saffron recipes! It’s probably because of the saffron buns we eat at Lucia that makes us associate this lovely spice with the festive season, but I love anything saffron, like this cake with white chocolate for example! So nice (and easy to make!)!

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I also love this saffron cheesecake, which you can either serve whole or in little bites like I’ve done here!

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And of course this lovely golden saffron pannacotta!

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Moving on to the proper sweets, this rocky road with honeycomb is one of the best you can make. It’s super easy (just be careful with the honeycomb – or use a Crunchie bar or store-bought honeycomb) and really fun to make!

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And these toffees are amazing too! You need a good thermometer but other than that’s it’s super easy! And the toffees are silky and yummy; definitely worth making and they make lovely little gifts too!

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If you want to make your own mulled cider or Swedish glögg, you’ll find the recipes here!

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I thought I’d give you my favourite weeknight supper recipe too, while we’re at it. And it’s this kale soup with frikadeller (pork quenelles). It’s warming, wintery and obviously good for you with all that kale!

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But let’s finish this little peek into the archives with a lovely Christmas dessert; my Winter pavlova with clementine curd, clementines and pomegranate! It’s absolutely delicious and a lovely way to finish off any festive meal!

Birthday dinner, Christmas event and a weekend in the country!

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The first whole week in November started nicely with Shake Shack and Younger (it’s finally available in the UK!) and an early night. I know it sounds decadent with a takeaway on a Monday, but isn’t that when we need it most?!

Tuesday I moved on to another show; The Morning Show on Apple TV +. Really good so far!

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On Wednesday I met up Gaby and Ro for dinner to celebrate Ro’s birthday! So lovely!

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Thursday I ate and shopped my way through Fortnum & Mason in the evening. Such a fun event!

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Friday we drove north for a weekend in the country and had a lovely TV supper in front of Pointless and Doc Martin in the evening.

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On Saturday we had baked potatoes for lunch and in the afternoon I baked a cake which we ate in front of the fire and in the evening we got dressed up for a fun dinner party!

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The next day was Remembrance Day so we went to the village church for a remembrance service and then had leftovers from the night before for lunch. Such a treat! We drove back to London in the evening but first had supper in front of the fire. So cosy!

 

 

Updated: Jerusalem Artichoke Soup 3.0 – with the Best Topping!

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Even though I obviously think about other things too (work, skincare, loved ones) food is on my mind a lot. I don’t actively think about it all the time but sometimes thoughts about food are idling in the background until they need my attention.

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And it was one of those idling thoughts that led to the discovery of the best topping for my favourite soup!

I have used prosciutto crumbs a lot lately (because they’re so so delicious!!) and suddenly it hit me that maybe they would work as topping for my creamy Jerusalem artichoke too? And yes, they did!

They’re not as salty as bacon (tried that but it didn’t work for me), yet offer a nice texture (unlike fried mushrooms – tried that too!) and they accompany my already favourite topping of chopped shallots perfectly.

Soooo, let me introduce you to my newly perfected Jerusalem soup recipe – with that wonderful new topping! Hope you like it too!

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Jerusalem artichoke soup 3.0, serves 4 as a starter

2 shallots, finely chopped 

1 tbsp butter

750 g Jerusalem artichokes, peeled and cut into similar sized pieces

water

1/2 good-quality stock cube (chicken or vegetable)

100 ml double cream

salt and pepper

Topping: 

3 slices prosciutto

1 shallots, finely chopped 

Fry the onions until soft in the butter without browning. Add the Jerusalem artichokes and fry for a minute. Cover with boiling water. Add salt and the stock cube and bring to the boil. Once the Jerusalem artichokes are soft, drain half the cooking liquid but keep it aside. Purée the Jerusalem artichokes and remaning water (adding more of the cooking water if needed) until you have a thick soup. Add the cream to the soup and bring it to the boil again. Season to taste. 

While the soup is underway, pre-heat the oven to 200C. Place the prosciutto slices on a baking parchment covered tray and let them crisp up in the oven for approx 5 minutes.  Leave to cool and chop it into crumbs.

Divide the soup between four bowls. Add chopped shallots and prosciutto crumbs. 

Recipe: Burrata with Girolles, Dill and Browned Butter

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As you may already know, I’m a HUGE burrata fan (which my archives can attest to!) and I eat it as often as possible during summer when there are plenty of tomatoes around because it pairs so well with the creamy pillowy cheese. But tomato season is sadly over and as a result there has definitely been less burrata in my life because I just haven’t found that perfect autumnal pairing for it. Until now.

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And it’s all thanks to Instagram and this post from Tuvessonskan! The slightly garlicky girolles and the nuttiness of the brown butter works so well with the creaminess of the burrata while the dill and lemon adds freshness. Do not forget the lemon; it balances the butter perfectly!

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Burrata with girolles, dill and browned butter, serves 2

1 small burrata

1 baguette (or crostini)

150 g fresh girolles

1 tbsp butter + 1 tbsp oil for frying

1 small garlic clove, finely chopped 

50 g salted butter

1/2 lemon

plenty of fresh dill

salt and peppar 

Remove the burrata from the fridge at least 30 minutes before you need it. Fry the mushrooms in oil an butter. Add the garlic towards the end. Season and put aside.

Brown the butter in a medium-sized pan on medium-high heat. Wait for it to foam up a lot and turn brown (but not dark) and smell nutty. Remove from heat.

Place the burrata in a shallow bowl or something with an edge. Arrange the girolles around the burrata. Spoon over the browned butter. Squeeze some lemon over the whole thing. Scatter with plenty of chopped dill. Season one last time and serve with bread. 

 

Eating out, theatre and weekend cooking!

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This week at the end of October, beginning of November was quite busy both work wise and socially with two weeknights out, so at the weekend we stayed in and hibernated.

Monday was quite uneventful. I survived my least favourite day of the week, got my work done and had leftovers for dinner.

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The next day I took the train to The New Forest and worked there all day.

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When I got back in London I met up with a friend for dinner. We went to Temper Covent Garden and had a lovely evening!

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On the Wednesday I used up some leftover girolles from the weekend and made myself a girolle toast for lunch.

On Thursday straight after work three of us had a quick bite to eat at Chick ‘n Sours before going to the theatre to see Groan Ups.

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Now, I’m not a big comedy fan, so when everybody else were laughing hysterically I only smiled, but a good comedy should have other elements too that I definitely can (and do) appreciate. And this one had them all; clever writing, really good acting, clever ways to tell the story and a deeper meaning underneath all the jokes, so I really (!) enjoyed it. Go see it!

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On Friday I probably made the last caprese salad for the season (as I refuse to use imported flavourless tomatoes) and in the evening I updated this gnocchi recipe and took it to a whole other Friday night level. You’ll find the new version here! And for pudding we had an ice cream sundae with homemade chocolate sauce. Easy and delicious!

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On Saturday we had eggs for breakfast (like always) and in the evening I made us Jerusalem artichoke soup (also updated – will post this soon!) to start followed by perfectly cooked cod loin with beurre blanc, new potatoes and peas. For pudding I attempted chocolate soufflés from a random recipe I found on the recipe. Although edible (just) it had completely the wrong texture, and wasn’t at all what I would call a soufflé so will have to find a better recipe!

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Sunday my boyfriend played golf and I baked a brown butter sponge cake with brown butter frosting. The frosting was amazing but I thought the cake itself a bit too try so will need to perfect this too.

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For dinner I made us girolle toast followed by the most amazing slow-cooked short rib with caramelised garlic mashed potatoes. Yum! Oh, and we finally finished season three of The Handmaid’s Tale.

 

 

Recipe: Danish Open-Faced Sandwiches Two Ways

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Although the Scandinavian countries are similar on the whole, there are lots of subtle differences. For example, the word for breakfast in Swedish; frukost, means lunch in Danish. Confusing!

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And when it comes to sandwiches, there are differences too! We’re all fairly passionate about good bread and our sandwiches are all open-faced so you get a good  ratio of topping to bread but in Sweden we prefer big sandwiches, like a good prawn sandwich that substitutes as a meal, but the Danish culture is all about smørrebrød; smaller open-faced sandwiches beautifully decorated with a lot of toppings. Most are on Danish rye bread (the dark one with whole kernels) but for some toppings like prawns, a white bread is better.

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My last day in Sweden in the summer we invited some friends over for a late fika before I needed to leave for the airport. I love having an activity planned the last day so it feels more lika a regular day than just a travel day, but at the same time I needed to pack and couldn’t do something too elaborate. So that’s why mamma and I decided on smørrebrød; they’re filling and easy to make, but because they look pretty it really looks like you’ve made an effort (even though you just assembled stuff). Afterwards we had cake and coffee and it was such a lovely afternoon.

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Open-faced sandwich with prawns, per sandwich

½ slice good quality white bread 

butter

1 little gem leaf 

½ boiled egg, sliced

1 tbsp Hellmann’s or homemade mayonnaise

ca 6 large cold water prawns, hand peeled

2 slices cucumber

1 slice lemon

1 sprig dill

Butter the bread and put the lettuce leaf on the bread. Spoon on half of the mayonnaise and place the egg slices on top. Add the rest of the mayo to the eggs and top with the prawns. Arrange the cucumber and lemon slices decoratively and finish with the dill. 

Open-faced sandwich with paté, per sandwich

½ or 1 small slice dark Danish rye bread

butter

1 little gem leaf

1 thick slice brussel’s paté or similar 

½ slice crispy fried bacon or pancetta 

1 tsp crispy onions 

pickled gherkins, sliced

1 tomato wedge

1 parsley sprig

Butter the bread and place the lettuce on the bread. Place the paté on top and add the bacon/pancetta nicely atop the paté, in the middle of the sandwich. On one side of the bacon add the crispy onions and on the other side the gherkins. Top with a tomato wedge and parsley.